How to Flip a Coin

Sprinters Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh finished the 100 meter in the track and field trials at the same time - even a camera recording 3,000 frames a second couldn't tell who won,

Sprinters Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh finished the 100 meter in the track and field trials at the same time . It was a race so close that even a camera recording 3,000 frames a second couldn’t tell who won.

You are going to need to settle bets in this life. And the best way to settle a two person bet is to flip a coin. At the U.S. Olympic track and field trails that would determine the American team at the London Games last summer, there was a tie for third place in the women’s 100m dash — they actually crossed the finish line at exactly the same time — and it would be a coin toss that would decide their fate.

Maybe you are not competing for a spot on the Olympic team but to become the captain of your bocce ball team, or to determine who will pick up the tab at a birthday party or to decide whose turn it is to go to the store to buy broccoli – whatever the stakes, you want a clean shake at your shot at glory. And if the tradition is good enough to decide stakes as high as who will compete in the Olympic Games, it shall be good enough for whatever bets you are calling.  So, here it is: how to flip a coin according to the professionals.

You don't need a guidebook to flip a coin the correct way, just this short guide and some gut instinct.

You don’t need rocket science to understand how to flip a coin the correct way, just this short guide and some gut instinct.

Choose a coin to flip. The smaller the coin is, the higher it flies. It must be an official coin of currency. In America, we like the quarter. In the EU, try the size-equivalent, a 50 cent euro coin (€0.50).

Choose a person to flip the coin. 

Assume the flipping position. Create a fist with your thumb inside the rest of your fingers. Now, pull the thumb out and place the tip of it into the creases of your forefinger knuckles. Practice flipping the thumb – you should wind up in the ‘thumbs up’ position.

According to the United States Track and Field Organization official handbook, “The USATF representative shall bend his or her index finger at a 90-degree angle to his or her thumb, allowing the coin to rest on his or her thumb.”

Place the coin on the nail of your prepared thumb/fist. Practice a couple of times to make sure that the position you have set helps the coin catch air.

Now that you are ready, find a place to flip where there is no possibility that the coin will role into a corner, under a pub stool or into the legs of furniture or hit by a dogs tail. The coin must fly and fall completely untouched by obstructing objects. Did you fail? It happens. Flip again.

Flip the coin: fist, thumb, place coin, flip. The coin should actually flip in the air, hence the creative name of the process.

Who will call the coin?  Whoever called the toss, typically calls the coin. We like to put the burden on a third party.

Let the coin fall, do not catch it. Let it teeter, totter, and settle onto the ground or floor.

Call the winner. Heads or tails, it’s not hard to see. Nobody touches the coin, everybody looks until the predetermined judge calls it.

Claim your winnings, do a dance, but remember to always try to be a graceful winner or a graceful loser. 

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Categories: How to do things, Life. Style., Toys + Games

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